2018 Book Club Review

She is too fond of books and it has turned her brain
Louisa May Allcott

 

On a  cold November evening in 2003, three of us met in the Village Hall and Hadlow Down Book Club began. Our first book was ‘The Girl with a Pearl Earring’.Since then, our numbers have grown; we have met regularly and read a wide range of books with some lively discussion over a glass of wine. Our meetings are informal and non-threatening and books are chosen democratically. Although we aim to read some challenging books, we do so without pressure and it is an enjoyable experience for all of us.

I’ve now been asked to write a short piece on a regular basis about the books we are reading, and I thought I would introduce it with an overview of some of the books from the past year.

One book by a new author was Francis Spufford’s acclaimed ‘Golden Hill’, a fast-moving story of 18th century New York in the style of ‘Tom Jones’.We recommend it for those who enjoy action but with a deeper meaning. Mothering Sunday’ by Graham Swift was a complete contrast – a short and beautifully intense erotic novel about a relationship between a servant girl and the young master set just after the First World War. I personally loved this novel and find it gets even better on re-reading.

Another short novel was Ian McEwan’s ‘Nutshell’ – a modern version of ‘Hamlet’ narrated by the unborn child in the womb of the Gertrude character. Extremely funny – this foetus develops a taste for fine wine and has a view on the state of the world from Radio 4 that his mother listens to. Our other McEwan Novel ‘The Children Act,’ was made into a successful film after we had read it – we like to think we are ahead of things. For those who, like me, enjoy dialogue and, in particular, closely-argued court scenes, this was an absorbing book about a moral dilemma and it was enhanced by McEwan’s usual erudition.

Elizabeth Moss was a new writer to us and we enjoyed the wit and humour of ‘Tidal Zone’. It was serious and potentially tragic about a teenager who suddenly has an anaphylactic seizure and dies for a few minutes. It is also full of humour, however, with its all too sharp observation of modern institutions and middle-class family life. Moss is herself an historian and her narrator’s research into the bombing of Coventry and the rebuilding of the cathedral provides depth of meaning and enhances a satisfying read. I have since read her ‘Night Waking’ and would recommend this novelist.

We have read a few Mann Booker prize winners including ‘The Siege of Krishnapur’ – a horrifying but hilarious account of moral and physical collapse by JG Farrell. We also read Penelope Lively’s ‘Moon Tiger’ (shortlisted for the Booker 50 Year Golden Award), and then ‘The English Patient’ which actually won the award. These two novels about the aftermath of WW2 marked a high spot in a year of enjoyable reading. Lively’s novel, written from the narrative viewpoint of a dying but reprobate old woman looking back on her unconventional life and loves as a war journalist crackles with life. ‘The English Patient’ by way of contrast centres on four war-scarred survivors who find refuge and healing in a ruined Italian castle – a place of haunting beauty and concealed dangers. It was quite a challenging read but one that continues to resonate in the mind. We all felt it was well worth reading.

Sometimes we enjoy something lighter and Gail Honeyman’s ‘Eleanor Oliphant is Absolutely Fine’ was  easy but satisfying with a real surprise at the end. About loneliness, it was sad but also had some very funny moments. We contrasted this with another novel about loneliness, ‘Our Souls at Night’ by Kent Haruf, a subtle, sensitive study of the relationship which develops between two elderly people who decide to spend platonic nights together.

Our current read is Carol Shields’s ‘The Stone Diaries’ and we meet on Wednesday 20th March to discuss it. Should you wish you join the group, contact me at heathermines2@hotmail.com or 830314.

 

Heather Mines

Annual Show Update

HADLOW DOWN HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW  2019

A challenging few weeks for gardeners prior to our Annual Show on 3rd August. However, our entrants managed to produce their usual high standards of produce (enormous potatoes this year), beautiful flowers,  and those who entered the Flower Arranging Class excelled themselves with creative colour for the ‘Bonfire’ display and a bit of humour for a display in an egg cup (there was even a toasted ‘soldier’ to go with the egg cup!)

The Domestic classes were a treat to see, with several fruit cakes, delicious breads, frittata and a good selection of jams, relish and the flavoured brandy.

There was a wonderful decorated cake with a Lego theme, difficult for ‘little fingers’ to keep their hands off as they wanted to play with the Lego pieces.

The entries for the art and crafts classes produced some interesting pieces, and of course the photographic section had some stunning photos as usual.  We had 9 entries for a Limerick in place of a poem, so look out for next year’s challenge!!!  Thank you to the children who entered the children’s classes, the Rocky Road looked yummy.

From all of us on the Horticultural Society Committee a big thank you for partaking in this colourful event in our Village Hall.  Thank you also to the team serving up the delicious cakes and teas in the afternoon, always a high point of the afternoon and a time for committee to sit down and enjoy listening to comments and to see the hall buzzing with people.

Hope to see you all again next year. (1st August 2020)

Happy Gardening

Kathy Cracknell

Charity Quiz Night

Come and support your local charity Engage in their annual fund-raising quiz. All proceeds go to running the TN22 Clubs, which helps to combat social isolation and loneliness and provides a vital resource for carers.

Hadlow Down Variety and Drama Club

Do you like to act, sing or dance? Can you play the piano or keyboard? Can you sew? Make and paint scenery? Design and make props? Are you interested in Sound and Lighting for stage productions? Can you design and sew costumes? Are you good at Publicity, Stage Management, or just making tea?
If you answer ‘Yes’ to any of these questions, then come and join Hadlow Down Variety and Drama Club.
Well established, we are a very friendly, fun-loving, lively and informal group. We put on plays, murder mystery dinners and pantomimes – all performed by the village, for the village.
In addition, we meet socially for meals out, mime and improvisation evenings, theatre visits and an annual barbecue.We are always looking to welcome new members.We’re about to start rehearsing for our annual Swash-Buckling Pantomime to be performed on the 29th and 30th November this year, so if you’re interested in joining us for that in whatever capacity please call Glenys on 01825 830857

Annual Show Details


Entry forms and fees to be handed in BEFORE Friday 2nd August.

8am-10am for exhibitors, 2pm for viewing. Prize giving at 3.30pm

All fruits, flowers and vegetables, except decorative classes and hydrangeas must have been grown in the exhibitors’ own ground. Pot plants must have been in the possession of the exhibitor for at least three months.

Only one exhibit per class may be entered by any one competitor.

Exhibitors shall, on request, allow members of the Show Committee to visit the place where their exhibits were grown.

All varities of vegetables, fruit and flowers to be named if possible.

Staging to be carried out between 8.30am and 10am on the Show morning.

Any exhibit not according to the schedule shall be disqualified.

The Society does not accept any responsibilty for any loss or damage to any exhibit.

Prize Giving 3,30pm, no exhibits to be withdrawn before 4pm.

Floral Art Section to be judged under NAFAS Rules.

HADLOW DOWN HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY ANNUAL SHOW 2019

SECTION 1 – Vegetables                                         Please see Rule 2   

  1. A garden trug of mixed vegetables (excluding herbs) to be judged on contents, quality and general presentation. Maximum length of trug 51cm.
  2. Four potatoes – one variety – White
  3. Four potatoes – one variety – coloured
  4. Three onions
  5. Three red onions
  6. Four shallots – pickling or large
  7. Three bulbs garlic
  8. Four carrots – one variety
  9. Six runner beans
  10. Six French beans
  11. Three leaves, spinach, kale or chard
  12. Two heads lettuce
  13. Six cherry type tomatoes (or small plum)
  14. Four standard tomatoes
  15. Four tomatoes of different varieties.
  16. Three beetroots
  17. Three courgettes not over 16cm
  18. Two cucumbers
  19. A misshapen vegetable
  20. Two of any vegetable not covered in schedule
  21. Five culinary herbs, named – one stem of each only – small pots provided.

STORMONT CHALLENGE TROPHY CLASS 1

ROWLAND GORRINGE CUP FOR HIGHEST POINTS IN CLASSES 2 – 21

SECTION 2 – Fruit                                                   Please see Rule 2

30 Ten blueberries
31 Ten soft fruit
32 Any other fruit (one)

EWART CHALLENGE CUP FOR HIGHEST TOTAL POINTS CLASSES 30-32

SECTION 3 – Flowers                                              Please see Rule 2

(Vases provided in classes 40 -49)

40 Single rose – one specimen bloom
41 Cluster-flowered rose – one stem
42 Flowering shrub – three stems, one variety excluding hydrangeas
43 Five sweet peas – one or more varieties
44 Three stems dahlias – one or more varieties
45 Vase of herbaceous perennials one or more varieties, four stems only
46 Vase of annuals – one or more varieties, four stems only
47 Lilies- one stem
48 One Spike e.g. delphinium, gladioli, hollyhock etc
49 Fuchsias – two stems, one variety
50 Three heads hydrangeas – lace cap type. Please bring your own container
51 Three heads hydrangeas – mop head type. Please bring your own container

ROPNER ROSE BOWL FOR BEST ROSE CLASSES 40-41

HARRISON CHALLENGE CUP HIGHEST TOTAL POINTS CLASSES 40-5

SECTION 4 – Domestic Classes

PLEASE PLACE ON YOUR OWN PLATE, WE WILL SUPPLY A COVER.

59 Four fresh eggs in any container
60 A loaf of Mediterranean style bread.
61 My favourite fruit cake.
62 A Childs Birthday Cake judged on decoration only. (Can use dummy cake)
63 5 Sweet biscuits
64 A Frittata
65 Jar of marmalade
66 Jar of relish
67 Jar of jam
68 Small jar of jelly – fruit or herb
69 A small bottle of flavoured Brandy
70 
5 pieces of fudge Men only

SLEE MEMORIAL CUP FOR HIGHEST TOTAL POINTS IN CLASSES 60-69

BARBARA BALL CUP FOR THE BEST ENTRY IN CLASS 70

Advanced Warning. In 2020 a small bottle of flavoured Rum

SECTION 5 – Flower arranging.   Tips on Hadlow down website.

80 “BONFIRE” up to 60cm
81 An arrangement in an egg cup.

POLLOCK MEMORIAL CUP FOR BEST EXHIBIT CLASSES 80-81

SECTION 6 – Craft

90 A Cushion cover up to 50cm
91 A soft toy for a child
92 A knitted or crocheted blanket for a premature baby. (up to 22×24 inch) (Unless you tell us otherwise we will donate entries to Tunbridge Wells hospital)
93 A necklace
94 A Child’s Birthday card
95 Article in wood, ceramic or metal

HADLOW DOWN CHALLENGE CUP THE BEST EXHIBIT IN CLASSES 90-95

 SECTION 7 – Art, Photography and Poetry

(Items not previously exhibited at this show)

100 A portrait in any medium. (Art)
101 A landscape in any medium (Art)
102 A still life in any medium (Art)
103 A print of a picture drawn/painted by the entrant on a computer tablet.
104 Photograph – “A Sporting event”
105 Photograph – “Winter”
106 Photograph – “I spy something beginning with M” All photographs to be unmounted, unframed and no larger than 13×18 cm

107 A Limerick (A4 paper, name on back)

VICE-PRESIDENT’S TROPHY FOR THE BEST EXHIBIT IN 100-102

ANNIVERSARY CUP FOR BEST EXHIBIT 104-106

STOCKLAND CUP FOR POETRY CLASS 107

 SECTION 8 – Junior Classes (12 years and under on day of show)
(No entry fee for children’s entries in any classes in show)
120 A painting/collage of a ship. Up to 7 years
121 A garden in a seed tray. Up to 7 years
122 A traction engine from recycled material no larger than 40cm. Up to 7years.
123 3 pieces of Rocky Road Cake. 8-12 years
124 A Poem “Summer Holidays” 8-12 years
125 A traction engine from recycled material no larger than 40cm 8-12 years
LADY LACEY CUP FOR THE BEST EXHIBIT IN CLASSES 120-125

HINTS FOR  EXHIBITORS

Tubers should be washed with a sponge.

Onions & Shallots:  Do not over-skin. Tops should be tied and roots trimmed.

Beet & Carrots:      Tops cut off leaving aprox 3”of leaf stalks, which should be neatly tied.p

Cabbage:                3” of stalk remaining.

Beans:                    Cut from vine with scissors with some stalk attached.

Courgette:              Do not cut main fruit to conform to size requirement.

Lettuce:                  Roots should be washed and wrapped in moist tissue, inserted into a plastic bag and neatly tied.

Tomatoes:              Aim for uniform set of fruits with small eye and firm fresh calyx.

Cucumbers:           Should be well matched, with a well developed stalk end.

Garlic:                    Leave 1” of dried stem.  Stage bulbs as complete specimens.

Soft Fruit:              Should be exhibited with stalks

Preserves:              Fully-dated label on lower half of jar. Jars to be full, with screw tops.

GUIDELINES   FOR   FLOWER  ARRANGING  EXHIBITS

  1. Plant material must predominate and be in good condition.
  2. Cut stems must be in water or water retaining foam.
  3. All mechanics and water retaining foam must be hidden.
  4. Make good use of space allowed. 2/3 of given measurement is a good guide.
  5. Any accessories used must be in scale with the exhibit.
  6. Clear interpretation of the class title is essential.

 

 

 

Village Film Night – Good Bye Lenin

Hadlow Down Village Hall in association with the ENGAGE charity present.
In October 1989, right before the fall of the Berlin Wall, Alex Kerner (Daniel Brühl) is living with his mom, Christiane (Kathrin Sass), and sister, Ariane (Maria Simon). But when the mother, a loyal party member, sees Alex participating in an anti-communist rally, she falls into a coma and misses the revolution. After she wakes, doctors say any jarring event could make her have a heart attack, meaning the family must go to great lengths to pretend communism still reigns in Berlin.

LanguagesEnglish, German, Russian

Saturday, 20th  October
Doors open 7.00 pm for 7.30pm
Refreshments available throughout – ice cream at the interval! Bring your own bottle of wine. A donation of £6 per ticket please. Book ahead or come on the door
Contact Janet 01825 830478 or Rachel 01825 830494

Hort. Soc. Car Visit to Driftwood Gardens

Car visit to Driftwood Gardens, Seaford.
10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. Thursday 12th. July
The cost is £11.50 which includes a talk on the gardens by the owners plus tea/coffee and cakes
Please confirm your attendance before 28th. June to Heather on 01825 830314
Meet at the venue.

 

Sing for your Supper

Friday 22nd June at the Village Hall from 7.30pm

The Variety Club would like to invite members and interested friends to join us for a fun filled sing-along with live music.

We will be joined by pianist Dom Hartley.  Favourite songs and popular numbers over the decades are on the menu together with Carol’s legendary chilli. (Vegetarian option will be available on request.) Bring a bottle with you or soft drinks will be available at the hall.

Singing ability is a bonus but not required! Just come along for the fun. Book with Glenys by Wednesday 13th June – 01825 830857 glenys.lake@btopenworld.com

Entry is free to all, but donations to the cost of the food would be most welcome at the event.

Homefront Lindy Hop Club

We teach Lindy Hop and Bal-Swing at the Village Hall on Thursday evenings.

Lindy Hop is a very sociable dance and has the added bonus of being really good exercise!

We also hold a monthly dance at local Village Halls in East Sussex. Come along and enjoy dancing, whether you Lindy, Jive or Rock ‘n Roll!

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us, for details of classes please see the calendar.

Activity Address Hadlow Down Village Hall
Name of Contacts Melanie and Simon
Telephone Melanie – 07766 881045  Simon – 07796 962997
Email homefrontlindyhop@yahoo.co.uk
Website www.homefrontlindyhop.co.uk